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Judith Collins asking for two week extension on election due date

Collins says she was “ever so close” to finishing everything up, but a family member died, her computer crashed, and she just needs “a little more time” to get things right.

Collins says she was “ever so close” to finishing everything up, but a family member died, her computer crashed, and she just needs “a little more time” to get things right.

In a late move this evening, Judith Collins has written an urgent letter to the Electoral Commission requesting a two week extension on her current election project, citing reasons of “personal hardship” for being unable to complete it by tomorrow’s due date.

Collins cited feeling “a bit under the weather”, an unreasonable workload, and that her partners on the project have been lazy, counterproductive, and “Frankly, I’m the one who’s done all the work.”

In her letter, Collins alleges that at least one of her partners is wilfully attempting to “mess the whole project up”, and that she can’t be held solely responsible for what it might end up looking like if it’s assessed on television tomorrow.

She told the Electoral Commission that she thought it would be “only fair” to extend out the election’s due date a couple of weeks, to give everyone more time to “perfect” their work.

She also appealed to a recent struggle with the death of a close relative, though declined to elaborate on how that relative died, describing it as a “personal matter.”

It’s possible that Collins is referring to one of her cousins, who was found drowned last week at Mangakuri Beach, having apparently got his feet tragically stuck in two blocks of cement.

The Prime Minister wouldn’t be drawn on the possibility of an extension today, saying only that she’d completed the work, and that the issue simply “is not on the list of issues where I’m at liberty not to talk vaguely around this for forty or so seconds.”

Green co-leaders Marama Davidson and James Shaw were also equivocal.

“Well, uhm, is there one available?” asked Shaw, leaning in with a hopeful expression.

But some parties were more emphatic.

“No,” snapped NZ First leader Winston Peters, when asked if the party wanted an extension. “Because we don’t need one.”

The Electoral Commission says it has received eight letters from New Zealand First requesting an extension, and two from the New Zealand First Foundation.

It would be unusual for an extension to be granted, particularly at this late hour, but National is hoping this year’s extraordinary circumstances, and the collective recent deaths from the entire caucus’s extend family, might make a difference.

Time, however, may be running out. The Electoral Commission says they haven’t yet read Collins’ letter, as it was flagged for suspicious substances, and has been taken away by people in hazmat suits.