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Kim Dotcom to help copyright activists by launching independent TV channel about Kim Dotcom

The channel’s flagship programme, KimAir, will feature Kim Dotcom doing outrageous things you should never do in an airplane.

The channel’s flagship programme, KimAir, will feature Kim Dotcom doing outrageous things you should never do in an airplane.

Citing what he sees as a broadcasting media biased toward the interests of the United States government, internet entrepreneur Kim Dotcom is planning to establish his own independent television channel here in New Zealand.

The channel, Kim TV, will feature 24 hours of nonstop Kim Dotcom-related programming, including interviews with the German-born immigrant, conspiracy documentaries about the U.S. Justice Department, and hours of original music he made in his bedroom.

It will also feature a news ticker at the bottom of the screen that will act as a live feed of Dotcom’s thousands of self-aggrandizing tweets, video game high scores and statistics about traffic to his new file sharing website Mega.

Dotcom said he hoped the channel would give a voice to those fighting to liberalise copyright laws, with countless hours of programming devoted to pictures of him posing with attractive women and obscenely expensive items.

In a statement released this morning, Dotcom said the channel would be a “revolution” in broadcasting.

“The political establishment is trembling in fear today,” read the statement. “Their world was already rocked by the glorious launch of #Mega, and will soon be shaken once more as Kim TV begins to dominate the airwaves.”

One of the channel’s most promoted shows is the widely anticipated KimAir, which will follow Dotcom’s adventures aboard his private jet.

“There are many things you should never do aboard an airplane,” reads the synopsis. “But Kim can, because it’s his.”

President of the Pirate Party of New Zealand Daniel Bertinshaw welcomed the TV channel, saying it would act as a rallying point for copyright activists to come together and watch Kim Dotcom take whacky selfies in his pool.

“We think it’ll help to show everyone what our movement is really about,” he said.

But some are expressing doubts about the endeavour, taking particular issue with their ability to legitimately stream or download the channel’s content from mega.co.nz. Dotcom acknowledged that this was a problem, but urged his followers to hang tight, saying he was actively looking into ways to offer the content illegally.