Upcoming election to overshadow important social, economic issues

Key and Cunliffe will face off in a lengthy contest to determine who can make the vaguest statements about the future of the country and the very planet itself.

Key and Cunliffe will face off in a lengthy contest to determine who can make the vaguest statements about the future of the country and the very planet itself.

Serious discussions concerning social welfare, education, and the overall health of the economy could take a back seat this year, say political analysts, as they will likely be overshadowed by the upcoming general election.

This year’s election appears set to put Labour opposition leader David Cunliffe up against National Prime Minister John Key, in a gruelling competition to determine who gets to sit on the left side of a small, cramped chamber for the next three years and explain why they’re not doing exactly what they said they would.

Political scientists, such as the University of Auckland’s Raymond Miller, say that it’s during the year of an election that we get “a valuable change of perspective.”

“There are a lot of problems in our communities, our society at large, that really need to be very seriously addressed,” explained Miller. “So that’s why election years are good. They allow us all to take one year out to, sort of, forget about all that stuff, and focus on what’s really not important.”

“It’s one of those rare moments in western, capitalist society, where, just for once, we all get to take a moment to think about what the majority of people want.”

Dr. Bryce Edwards, of Otago University, said that New Zealanders could expect to hear a lot less about normal issues like the economy, healthcare, education, poverty, and crime, and expect to hear a lot more about issues “perhaps more befitting of a national referendum on the future of our very society,” such as who interacts best with children, the difference of a few tax dollars, and which television programmes will be cancelled for the leaders’ debates.

But while election year will bring relief to most, it may be set to bring misfortune to others, such as Prime Minister’s son Max Key – who by the end of the year may no longer be able to brag on Facebook – or ACT Party Leader John Banks, who is already facing similar challenges.