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Women’s Weekly to give away tickets to royal birth

Women’s Weekly is expected to more than double its circulation this week after offering readers the chance to look under the sheet as William and Kate’s first child is finally born.

Women’s Weekly is expected to more than double its circulation this week after offering readers the chance to look under the sheet as William and Kate’s first child is finally born.

A prominent British women’s magazine is running a competition that will give away two tickets to watch the birth of the royal baby of Prince William and Kate Middleton.

Women’s Weekly, which sells around 340,000 copies a week, will be including in this week’s issue a form that any of its readers can fill out and send back to the publication. A random draw will be held, and if they are selected, they will be flown to Wales to watch the birth from one of two front row seats positioned at the end of the Duchess’ hospital bed.

Women’s Weekly promised that the seats would provide an intimate view of Kate’s vagina, “as it releases its divinely ordained progeny into the world.”

The magazine’s editor, Diane Kenwood, said it would be a “magical” experience for the two lucky winners, who would have the immense privilege of watching a future King or Queen be born.

“Ever since Kate became pregnant, there has not been a single issue more on the mind of our readers than the birth of her child,” said Kenwood. “We get emails and letters every day asking ‘when will it be born?’, ‘what will it look like?’, ‘what if it’s retarded?’ That sort of thing. So we just thought there would be no better gift to our readers than to let them watch it all first hand.”

Kenwood cautioned readers that the prize was subject to change, and there would be nothing the magazine could do if the Duchess elected to have a caesarian.

But experienced gynaecologist Jerry Powell said that prize winners were likely to be disappointed regardless of what happened, and that they would find the experience to be “very bloody and pulpy.”

“It won’t look a thing at all like William,” he said. “Particularly if it’s a girl.”

Kenwood dismissed these claims, saying that Powell had no authority to speak on the matter, as he had only supervised non-royal births.

The competition follows several earlier sweepstakes, in which readers of various magazines were encouraged to guess the weight of the baby and which of its parents it will love most.